Author Archive

christmasard2017

More about CLIPPED WINGS

Recognized on the first Friday in November each year, Fountain Pen Day is celebrated by enthusiasts worldwide as a time to embrace, promote, and share the use of fountain pens, since 2012.

How will YOU celebrate Fountain Pen Day on November 3, 2017?
Visit the official Fountain Pen Day webpage for ideas.

Saturday, October 14, 2017
For more information, visit Indie Author Day 2017

Math-ProblemOOPSIE!

My word count estimate for the first rough draft of CLIPPED WINGS may have been way off.

I’m not a PLOTTER (a writer who plans out a storyline in detail).

I’m not an OUTLINER (a writer who creates a story outline before beginning to write).

I’m a PANTSER (I don’t plan out anything; I fly by the seat of my pants). I write the opening chapter and the closing chapter, then let the story develop organically between the beginning (point A) and the ending (point B).

Characters (even though they are fictional) have a way of driving the direction of a story as it develops through their actions, feelings, stubbornness, and drama. Every manuscript I’ve written has been character driven, CLIPPED WINGS is no different.

I am currently writing chapter 18. I realize now, my word count estimate was not adequate to fully tell the story. Yes, the manuscript is shaping up to be “epic” in length (between 150,000 – 200,000 words), but don’t worry, CLIPPED WINGS is not characteristically “epic” in any other way.

(I should have paid more attention in Algebra Class)

Additional information can be found at CLIPPED WINGS


Image via YouTube

It’s suggested authors and writers are to write about things they know. Some compose memoirs, an account of events from their authentic life, and others create an artificial world out of their imagination. Even an imagined world has elements from an authentic life, no matter how small. So where do authors draw the line of distinction between reality and fiction? The answer would depend if the author is writing fiction or a memoir. A fictional work could take place in a real-world location, however, the characters, if based on real living individuals, the author would change the characteristics of the real-life individuals, so the reader can not identify the characters to the real-life people they are writing about. Authors can be sued for libel, defamation, and/or slander. To get around this obstacle authors use a little trick; a colloquial term, a euphemism to denote distortion of fact called: artistic license, where elements of reality and fiction become blurred in a way which masks the true elements of reality.

I had to decide if I would write my new manuscript as a memoir, or as a work of fiction? The premise of both manuscripts would center on a specific set of circumstances from real-world events. So, could I tell the story better as a memoir or as fiction? If I wrote a memoir, there would be key parts of the real-world story which would not be included in the manuscript, due to possible legal ramifications. However, if I composed a fictional manuscript, retaining key components of the story as possible. Real-world facts within fictional elements (artistic license) would be retained without worry of reprisal or possible legal repercussion. I decided to write a story based on actual real-world events in the form of a fictional novel, tentatively entitled: CLIPPED WINGS.

A tale of a zealous authoritarian high school administrator exploits his position to break Shane Davison’s teen spirit, unaware of the Pandora’s box he has unintentionally opened. The administrator’s unrestrained actions set into motion a chain of events which no one expected, in this early 1970’s narrative, told from Shane’s teenage perspective. Shane takes the reader into his confidence to reveal a nightmare of biased victimization in a small, ultra-conservative, north Oklahoma town. A true, honest-to-goodness southern literary fictional novel, inspired by actual events being written by Dale Thele.

So, how blurred are the lines between reality vs. fiction in CLIPPED WINGS? The manuscript is a current work in progress, but I can assure you, the storyline blurs repeatedly into murky gray areas of artistic license.

Texas Book Festival 2016

Posted: November 5, 2016 in Events
Tags: , ,

Saturday morning rain showers didn’t stop Austinites from venturing downtown to the annual Book Festival. High spirits, laughter, umbrellas, wet clothes and puddle splashing made for an unusual but entertaining Book Festival for all ages.

1111

Saturday, November 5 & Sunday, November 6
10th & Congress Ave, Austin, Texas

Some of the many outstanding individuals who have made an impact on my life:
(1) Sir Elton John; (2) Elizabeth Taylor; (3) Earvin “Magic” Johnson; (4) Mikhail Carreon Taggueg, Founder/ HIV advocate/ HIV Counselor at The Cagayan Valley Support System; (5) Rock Hudson; (6)Prentiss Douthit, Hill Country Ride for AIDS Ride Director; (7) standing: Glenda Whitehead, Gwen Kingery, Maxine Carstedt, seated: Barbara Graham. Not pictured: Linden Zimmerman; (8) Edgar Gierbolini, Development Director at Care Communities and Ken Martin, Executive Director at Care Communities; (9) David Powell, founder of the David Powell (HIV) Clinic, Austin, Tx; (10) Greg Revenj, HIV Advocate; (11) Ryan White

COUNT
Each and every day I encounter people living with an HIV diagnosis who have resigned themselves to sit hour after hour in front of the television waiting to die. They have convinced themselves they’re too sick to step foot out of doors to enjoy the world around them. These individuals rarely socialize with others outside of their close HIV circle of friends. Somewhere, they have lost their desire to live, instead they simply exist until the virus takes them to the next dimension. My heart bleeds for those once active and productive individuals who succumbed to the perception that their lives were over when they received their HIV diagnosis.

Nearly four years ago, I received my HIV diagnosis along with what the doctor referred to as “full-blown AIDS.” Immediately, I begun medical treatment. The first year wasn’t pleasant as my body rejected the myriad of chemicals forced on it. But once my body became tolerant to the medications I wanted to resume living again. Slowly I became involved with activities in the outside world, I learned and accepted my limitations. I searched out opportunities to volunteer my time. It didn’t take long before my monthly planner became and stayed full with activities that benefited the HIV community. I consciously remind and schedule time to care for myself. I’m LIVING and not just existing. All of us will die someday, we have no idea when or where, but I’m not willing to resign myself to the ritual of waiting for the inevitable. Inactivity and negative thinking do nothing positive for the person with an HIV diagnosis.

Every community offers opportunities to give-back to the community which has assisted the individual living with HIV. My advice for any person with HIV is to volunteer in your local community take a class at the community college, participate in a crafting workshop, join a book club, take a walk, feed the ducks or geese… just return to the world of the LIVING. You have talents and ideas to share with others, become productive, rejoin and contribute to the world around you. HIV is a controllable virus, not a death sentence. Stand up to HIV and let the world see YOU for who you are … a beautiful, caring human being with an extraordinary soul. Celebrate the wonderful gift you were given … the gift of LIFE.

Pic1-a

Since receiving my HIV/AIDS diagnosis on December 1, 2012, I’ve looked back at how many people have helped get me to where I am today. It’s said that it takes a “village” to assist a person with HIV. I’ll attempt to identify the people of my “village”:

21 medical doctors and medical specialists have and/or are currently treating my symptoms.

1 primary care physician, since the original diagnosis, an infectious disease doctor specializing in HIV/AIDS.

4 hospitals, with countless nurses, nurse techs, lab techs, food service and housekeepers.

2 stays in Intensive Care Units with around the clock nurses.

5 testing facilities for numerous x-rays, MRI’s, other type of scans and lab work.

8 out of town blood labs that analysis blood draws.

City, County, State and Federal agencies that coordinate medical, health and basic living accommodations.

4 case managers and countless counselors guiding my every step

1 Federal Judge who presided over my Social Security Disability Appeals Hearing, and the court reporter and occupational therapist.

5 Care Team members who have/are volunteer their time to guarantee I get to and from my appointments, run errands and a receptive ear when I feel lost.

1 in-home nurse who visits every other week to make sure I am receiving the best care possible and that my basic and medical needs are being met.

28+ friends living with HIV who share their fears, tears, disappointments and frustrations of living with HIV.

4 Austin AIDS Service Organizations and their staffs who give their all to do whatever they can to make my quality of life better.

Newspaper, TV, photographers, reporters and magazine staffs who have given me the opportunity to let my voice be heard so to share my story of hope to others.

Thousands of faceless, nameless individuals who freely and compassionately give of their time, talents and money supporting the many organizations and services I depend on daily.

Countless Pharmacists who fill my 22 prescriptions and followup with instructions of how and when to take my meds.

1 dietitian and 1 nutritionist to guide my daily nutritional needs. 

1 Physical therapist

2 Lawyers and a number of legal aids who assisted in my appeals for SS Disability

Countless friends, who are my daily strength and encouragement, empowering me to see my dreams.

??? How many others I can’t recall right now.

As you can surmise, I’ve been blessed with more than a “village”, but an entire “CITY”, one that has and continues to support my fight with HIV/AIDS. I’m so very grateful for my “CITY” and thankful that they have and will continue to be there for me. That’s a whole lot of gratitude I owe to thank my “CITY”. I can’t possibly thank everyone, but what I can do is volunteer my time, dedication, passion and efforts to educate and share my story. With my voice I’m able to extend my gratitude, to GIVE BACK to my “CITY” by doing my small part towards making our world free of HIV.

That’s why I became an HIV/AIDS Advocate.